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Latest Courses

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Professional Development Programme (University of East Anglia)



MPhil/PhD in International Development (Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath)


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MSc Wellbeing & Human Development (Department of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath)


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MA Globalisation and Development (IDS, University of Sussex)


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MSc Globalisation and Development (IDPM University of Manchester)


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MBA International Management (Monterey Institute for International Studies)


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MPA International Management (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


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Development Project Management Institute (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


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MA International Policy Studies (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


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MA International Trade Policy (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


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Conservation Leadership Program - CLP (Monterey Institute of International Studies)


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MSc Cooperation and Development
(Institute for Advanced Study of Pavia - IUSS)


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Human Rights Fieldwork - Principles, Strategies and Skills (BIR06)
(International Human Rights Network)


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Customized Courses/Study Programs (International Institute of Rural Reconstruction - IIRR)


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PhD in Development Studies
(University of Melbourne)


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MSc NGOs and Development (London School of Economics & Political Science)



BSc Economics (University of Bath)



MRes International Development (Departmemt of Social & Policy Sciences, University of Bath)


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MSc Economics (Development )(Department of Economics, University of Bath)


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MSc Building and Urban Design in Development
(University College London)


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MSc Urban Economic Development
(University College London)


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MSc Urban Development Planning
(University College London)


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Welcome to Studying Development. Find study and training courses in International Development and Humanitarian Aid. The site aims to help orientate those wishing to enter, or already active in Development and Humanitarian Aid. This course directory is international in scope and covers professional training, as well as university degree courses.
Finding a Course
Browse courses by Training Provider, Type, Country, Thematic Focus or search below.
Detailed Search
Useful Links
Explore our collection of annotated resources. If you know of a great resource, please feel free to suggest a link.

Readings & Reviews
Explore recommended course books, as well as other readings. You are also welcome to suggest a reading or submit a review.
A Radical History of Development Studies: Individuals, Institutions and Ideologies.
A Radical History of Development(2005) edited by Uma Kothari

This edited collection assembles what are otherwise often scattered and implicit contributions to thinking on the history of Development Studies as a subject. The authors reflect on their own experiences in the sector and examine the evolution of both the roles of institutions and development discourse. In doing so, this book presents a more nuanced and contested evolution and serves to highlight the contributions made by thinking, which although part of its day, is seldom part of orthodox recollection.

For anyone new to the subject this historical perspective provides an essential introduction to its origins, which constitutes the backdrop to fuller understanding of contemporary changes and trends in both the theory and practice of development.

Find Work in Development
Find a job, internship or voluntary work opportunities in the field of development. We maintain a special entry-level development jobs category to help you get your first job in the sector. Advertising a position is free and everyone is welcome to Post a Vacancy.
Retrospectives
Read what others have said about their experiences studying development. Pieces range from short commentaries to longer, in-depth opinion pieces or essays. All members are welcome to contribute Retrospectives.
Study, Training, and Practice News
Read the latest Study, Practice and Training News posted by the community. Your contributions are welcome. Please login or register to submit news items.
Guest PhD Scholarships in International Development Studies at Roskilde University

The Graduate Researcher School of International Development Studies at Roskilde University, Denmark announces a limited number of short-term scholarships intended for Ph.D. students already engaged in a formal Ph.D. study programme, but who would be interested in pursuing part of their programme with IDS, Roskilde. A certain preference will be given to students from the developing world. A limited number of guest scholarships are available for Ph.D. students for a period ranging from 3 to 5 months. The scholarships are in the amount of DKK 10.000 per month and should cover basic living expenses.

For further info: http://ruc.dk/ruc_en/research/PhD/socsc/intdev/

How volunteering at Unesco changes lives
In international organisations such as Unesco, interns are welcome to work alongside staff on development programmes and special projects. And, fortunately for the agency, many young people are willing to do just that, offering their time in exchange for experience. So, what drives this motivation, and what challenges and lessons are learned along the way?

Unpaid labour makes up a relatively sizeable part of the workforce at Unesco's Bangkok branch. At any one time, there are usually 15 to 30 young people volunteering for anything between a month and a whole year.

Apart from interns, there are other classified volunteers as well. Mostly female, they come in all ages, though most average in their late 20s, with a wide range of experience, educational backgrounds and nationalities, mainly Europe, North America and developed Asian nations like Japan, South Korea and Hong Kong. Unesco's director Sheldon Shaeffer hopes to see more interns from Southeast Asia, especially Thailand.

To be eligible, interns should be enrolled in university and be able to volunteer a maximum of six months. Although they receive no stipend, Unesco internships are well regarded by young people seeking international careers. The process for many begins at www.unescobkk.org/index.php?id=2703.

However, opportunities as great as this come at a price with many volunteers learning unexpected lessons.

For starters, the work can be intense with volunteers investing both passion and energy to contribute to Unesco's mission. Just like paid staff, they find themselves working long hours in order to maximise success. The key motivational factor for volunteers is their sense of achievement and contribution to a great cause.

When asked about the biggest challenges, financial concerns and disappointment rank highly. All agree that longer stays amount to a better, more satisfying experience, as it takes time to get to know a project well. But long stints as a volunteer don't come easy or cheap. Apart from the cost of flying to Thailand, expenses include accommodation, food, a laptop, visas and even transport to and from work-related events, such as meetings and conferences, even when outside of Thailand.

Feeling unappreciated in the rush to get things done also affects motivation, though some volunteers feel more frustrated than others. "We don't expect payment, but more appreciation would be nice," one volunteer said. Being at the bottom of the hierarchy where credit for good work can be overlooked may result in diminishing enthusiasm, and enthusiasm is a volunteer's most essential attribute.

Read the full article: How volunteering at Unesco changes lives

Corporate social opportunity – Taking ethical risks to market
Growing numbers of companies are seeing opportunities in meeting social and environmental needs, but business as a whole is not moving fast enough, say David Grayson and Adrian Hodges

Global revolutions in technology, markets, demographics and values are giving companies a whole new set of issues that they have to manage urgently.

These issues include the environment, human rights, diversity, health, work-life balance and the community. Historically, these have been regarded as “soft issues”, but they have become “hard” for business: hard to ignore, hard to manage, and very hard for the businesses that get them wrong.

We first marked this trend in our book Everybody’s Business: Managing Risks and Opportunities in Today’s Global Society, in 2001. Three years later, in Corporate Social Opportunity, we further developed our argument that, handled correctly, these issues need not just be about minimising risk, but could become a source of new marketplace insight and a stimulus to innovation. We always saw corporate social opportunity as being a corporate mindset, as well as developments in products and services. UK fruit smoothies maker Innocent Drinks, which has made its commitment to sustainability integral to its brand identity and values, and retailer Marks & Spencer’s Plan A commitment are good examples of what corporate thinking for sustainability can achieve.

Read the full article: Corporate social opportunity – Taking ethical risks to market

Latest Institutional Member

University of Manchester

Institute for Development Policy and Management, University of Manchester


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"IDPM's objective is to promote social and economic development, particularly within lower-income countries and for disadvantaged groups, by enhancing the capabilities of individuals and organisations through education, training, consultancy, research and policy analysis. We see The Studying Development website initiative as an excellent means of promoting these goals."